Photography – Garden Fountain – Lensbaby

Bubbles-sWe have this fountain that lights up on our patio. So last night around dusk I decided to try my Sol 45 Lensbaby lens on my Sony a6000. So far I have only used it for flower photography. The lens faired pretty well under the light conditions and was able to capture the bubbles while keeping the water streams smooth.

Flower Photography – Lensbaby

Clamatis-lensbabyLensbaby Sol 45 with 16mm extension tube  – Sony A6000 – f/6.3; ISO 250; 1/400 sec.

“Expectation is everything. Every day can be your day, if you expect it to be.”               Bob Moawad

Thought I would try taking some more photographs with the Lensbaby Sol 45. This time I added a 16mm extension tube. It seemed to work really well. It was a little windy today so I set the shutter speed to 1/400 of a second and was surprised at how sharp the focal point was given the wind.

Bud-Lensbaby

Bee on Bud-Lensbaby

 

Flower Photography – Lensbaby

LensbabySony a6000; Lensbaby Sol 45; 1/200 Sec; ISO 250

I bought this lens a year ago and was really frustrated with the results of my photography sessions. No matter how I adjusted the lens or bokeh blades my photos left a lot to be desired. Yet many photographs taken by others with this lens were amazing. Why theirs and not mine?

Initially, we were not a good fit. The whole purpose of the Lensbaby is to create soft, dreamy photographs. I am someone who strives to create clear, sharp photographs.  I suddenly realized when using this lens I was just shooting to shoot. So I set out to create one really sharp area in an image and let the rest just happen through adjusting the bokeh blades. Much happier with the results and this lens has become a whole lot of fun!

Flower Photography – Simply a Daisy

Pink Daisy - Soft Petals

Sony a6000; Lensbaby Sol 45 with extension tubes; manual focus.

“The splendor of the rose and the whiteness of the lily do not rob the little violet of its scent nor the daisy of its simple charm. If every tiny flower wanted to be a rose, spring would lose its loveliness.” Therese of Lisieux