Those Amazing Insects

One of my favorite subjects to shoot is insects. I have found the best time to photograph them is early in the morning when the air temperature is still cool and crisp.

clover

f/22; 1/50; ISO 100; 250mm

lady bug final wp

f/11; 1/60; ISO 800; 60mm

bee final

f/5; 1/60; ISO 100; 42mm

 

f/7.1; 1/80; ISO 250; 60mm – f/5.6; 1/400; ISO 640; 240mm

 

Sometimes You Just Get Lucky!

Bird & dragonfly.jpg

I was testing a camera lens for distance. So I decided to shoot this bird that was perched on a branch near the top of the tree. When I got home to view the shots I took that day, it was an unexpected surprise to see the dragonfly on the tip of the top tree branch. 

f/14; ISO 400; 1/1600; 250mm

Bleeding Hearts

Bleeding Hearts wp.jpg

“The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched… they must be felt with the heart” Helen Keller

f/8; 1/100; ISO 100

Daisies – Fun with Mylar

Reflective Daisies WP

“You use a mirror to see your face; you use works of art to see your soul”, George Bernard Shaw. 

The Chicago Botanic Gardens offered an abstract photography class. I didn’t take the class because I am particularly fond of abstract photography, I enrolled because I had heard that the class material challenged students to look at the subject matter from a different perspective and creatively shoot.

The photograph above of two placed daisies was shot on a piece of mylar film. 

f/7.1; 1/80; ISO 800.

Comments are always welcome.

Calla Lilies – water drops

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“Time itself comes in drops.”  William James – f/8; 1/320; ISO 400.


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The sturdy calla lily petals with their smooth and graceful curves are the perfect subject to shoot water drops. The water drops display a nice variety of shapes and sizes without dripping into the center of the flower.  

These calla lilies where placed in a vase and set on my patio table two feet in front of an evergreen which made the background very easy to darken. f/8; 1/60; ISO 400. 

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A Toad and Two Frogs

“There are some things one can only achieve by a deliberate leap in the opposite direction.” Franz Kafka

frog4comp_jpgThree different adventures, three different subjects – On each photo shoot I had no idea what my subject was going to be. Normally I like to take my macro lens when walking along shorelines and in wooded areas. But on these three occasions my camera had  a 55-250mm lens attached to it which allowed me to capture these subjects without disturbing them.

The toad shown above hopped out a few feet in front of me when I was walking along a dirt path in a wooded area in the fall. It was no more than two inches big. Luck would have it that it posed on a multi-colored leaf that made this subject fun to shoot. Camera settings: f/5.6; 1/40; ISO 200; 171mm.


Frog 4x6 (2) - Copy

Amongst an abundance of floating duckweed in a creek, a little head appeared ever so slightly rippling the water. I would not have seen it if it had not been for the ripple. Camera Settings: f/7.1; 1/40; ISO 100; 250mm.


Bull frog
Camera Settings: f/16; 1/40; ISO 100; 250mm

Strolling down by a lake, I happened to peak over some shoreline plants and discovered a bull frog who appeared to be waiting for dinner. This photo was taken just before dusk. Just right for reflections on the water surface.  Camera Settings: f/16; 1/40; ISO 100; 250mm.